April 2021’s Supermoon

Lilly Sanderson, Reporter

 April 2021’s Supermoon

When a full moon is described as a “Pink” moon or a “supermoon” many are quick to be confused. A supermoon happens when the full moon coincides with the moon’s closest approach to Earth in its orbit. Supermoons make the moon appear a little brighter and closer than normal, although the difference is hard to spot with the naked eye. The moon will even apear a pinkish tint some days, giving it the nickname “Pink Moon”. Sadly the moon will never appear as a beautiful bright pink, even though the name does suggest it. The Full Pink Moon’s name comes from the abundance of moss phlox, a common little pink flower that typically begins to spread across the ground in early spring. In many native american cultures Aprils full moon is associated with the beautiful life and vibrant growth of spring.

History of the supermoon can start where it got its name. The term “supermoon” was coined in 1979 and is often used today to describe what astronomers would call a perigean full moon: a full moon occurring near or at the time when the Moon is at its closest point in its orbit around Earth. The term gives preference to the geometric alignment of Sun-Earth-Moon and allows the occurrence of perigee into a wider time period than the actual instant of perigee (up to about two weeks, which is almost half of the Moon’s orbit).

On the 26th of April 2021, and further into this year. Supermoons will appear ranging from colors of red, pink, orange, and even a light shade of blue. The supermoon will start to appear after sunset on the lovely Monday night in April. To see this Supermoon best you can see it from your backyard, a park, or 20 minutes outside of town so you can see the brighter sky with less light pollution, which is my personal favorite spot. Try to catch these beautiful events within the year because sometimes these can be a once in a lifetime experience.