‘TRAPPED’ training makes a diffrence

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‘TRAPPED’ training makes a diffrence

Morrison Jones-Thiede, Reporter/Page Editor

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  It was nothing that I had ever seen before, it tested me. It tested my physical strengths, my mental capability and my entire way of thinking about life and the way that I affect people. It made me do things I didn’t think was possible or thought that I would ever do. At certain points, it tested my sanity.

  I attended the annual TRAPPED (Teens Rising Above Peer Pressure Every Day) conference that was being hosted by the Idaho Falls local CYA (Community Youth in Action), along with Serena Harris (11), Emily Oyola (10), Nikayla Liebe (10), Shaylee Suekel (11) and many, many more. The event happened May 1-4 at the Fairbridge Inn here in Idaho Falls.

  There were in total around sixty students that attended and roughly thirty off-and-on chaperones accompanied by a handful of trusted teens and adults to help lead the event. Everything was taken care of for me while I was there: I had breakfast, lunch and dinner all 3 days with everything from making your own fresh waffles to soup in bread bowls with a wide array of drinks and snacks in between. I mean, who doesn’t like fresh hot chocolate or raspberry cheesecake cookies delivered to there hotel door just before bed?

  “The most important part is to come together as a family,” Harris said. “Most people in high school feel like they are alone, and when you get put into a place where you don’t know anyone, you learn to love everyone,” she added.

    “We did lots activities from obstacle courses to team-building exercises. Being able to bond with people and make new friends was probably was my favorite part, but overall friendship and team building is the most important part of TRAPPED, but gaining knowledge about leadership skills and how to be a true leader is good too. Sign up fast, it fills up quickly!” Liebe said. “Even if you aren’t super outgoing, it’s a good way to open up without being overwhelming,” Suekel said.

  In addition to growing out of social comfort zones, the program brings in some insightful speakers. “The most important part is probably getting something out of the speakers that come to talk with us,” Suekel said. Harris agreed:“The speakers are my favorite part. Being able to listen to other peoples stories and listening to what other people have gone through really helps you to feel like you are not alone, like other people can relate,” Harris said.

  For example, there was a very deep and a descriptive account of how alcohol almost ruined a young boy’s life, but that didn’t stop him from being almost one of the biggest country singers out there.  

  We also heard from people whose lives were dramatically changed and those who lost loved ones from not only drinking and driving, but also from being distracted while driving.

  But alcohol and drugs weren’t the only subjects discussed: depression and suicide were addressed along with mental health issues such as schizophrenia and how people with mental health conditions aren’t all bad and none of them chose to be.

   In the end, it showed me that I was wrong about my life being tough. I also realize now how I have many people that I can call on for help and friendly advice when I need it.

 

 

 

Everything was taken care of for me while I was there: I had breakfast, lunch and dinner all 3 days with everything from making your own fresh waffles to soup in bread bowls with a wide array of drinks and snacks in between. I mean, who doesn’t like fresh hot chocolate or raspberry cheesecake cookies delivered to there hotel door just before bed?

 

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