Violence survivors struggle with guilt

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Violence survivors struggle with guilt

Max Webster, Investigative Reporter

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Last month three victims of the Stoneman Douglas and Sandy Hook shootings were found dead within the span of a week. Believed to have taken their own lives over survivors guilt, the three students, family members, and friends now rest easy in the towns of Parkland, Flor. and Newtown, Conn. Our hearts are with the victims of those lost in the shootings and the families of those who recently passed.

Jeremy Richman, age 29, lost his daughter Avielle in the Sandy Hook shooting in 2013. In an interview with CNN he explained how he coped with his loss, “Every day we need to get out of bed. And Jen and I just came up with a just beautiful idea to get us out of bed. Every day we try to find something of beauty, something that makes you feel the world’s a good place. And every day we want to make sure we try to, really strive to give back something of beauty, something to the world.” After the shooting, He started the Avielle Foundation, a foundation that focuses on reducing violence by means of community action. Even despite his focus on mental health, he struggled to cope with his loss.

Sydney Aiello, a student at Stoneman Douglas when the 2018 shooting happened, graduated in 2018. Friends and family described her a happy and bubbly person who always had a smile on her face. However, the shooting changed her as time went on. As she lived with the memories of that day and with the loss of fellow students, she was pushed to doctors who diagnosed her with PTSD. Sydney was found on Mar. 13 and is now resting peacefully.

The second student, who is unnamed, is believed to have suffered from PTSD from the shooting of Stoneman Douglas. The parents of the student want to make students and parents aware of stress and depression and want everyone to know there is always a sunnier day.

In the event that you or a loved one is experiencing PTSD, survivor’s guilt, or any other type of depression, you can seek help from the suicide hotline (1-800-273-8255), a teacher that you trust, or the skyline counselors. Your life does matter to those around you and you are here for a reason.

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