WestSide Story

[Sorry This Story is Unavailable Please Look at Article 13 For More Information]

Marcos Resendiz-Lopez, Page Editor, Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story







 The EU has been under fire these past few months because they recently passed Article 13 and Article 11, which is referred to as either the“meme ban” or the “link tax” (if you want to sugar coat it.) What it basically does is put more responsibility on other companies such as YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter to make sure that copyrighted material isn’t being illegally distributed within it.

  Article 13 is the one that has been the center of controversy. The article is aiming for “Use of protected content by online content sharing service providers storing and giving access to large amounts of works and other subject-matter uploaded by their users.” Article 13 aims to also filter various other websites so they don’t allow certain copyrighted material, plus the EU is going to make them liable for it (kind of like that one part in Orwell’s 1984.)

   So what does this mean for groups within Facebook, Instagram, and MySpace? Well, unfortunately, it’s like YouTube’s form of taking down copyrighted material, but for memes and probably 10x worse. So it’s going to be like a bot going around the internet to ban memes and possibly fine people for doing so.

  It’s easy to see that the EU is really off the goop with passing this new article. They most likely don’t know what a VPN is or that it’s near impossible to remove something off. This might evolve into the EU passing another law where you need a license to look at memes, like how you need a license to watch TV, and a license to own a butter knife.

 So what has the community been doing to voice the decision? Imagine the meme war of the 2016 election, but with the EU. People left and right were making constant memes about their disapproval of the article, even starting the #deleteart13 movement, and the geniuses of the internet even spat on the EU by making memes of the meme ban by putting a filter over a meme with the caption “The content you are trying to view has been banned by the EU copyright law.”

  This is all a pretty good and all, but what are the Britbongs doing to prevent this ban? Fortunately, saveyourinternet.eu has provided sources for the people who don’t want this law to pass and are even giving instructions on what to say via phone call or email. Luckily for the United States this won’t affect us much, so we can all laugh in peace with our microwaved water and spacious neighborhoods.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




The Official Online Newspaper of Skyline High School
[Sorry This Story is Unavailable Please Look at Article 13 For More Information]