WestSide Story

Starvation struggle: The need is real

Alejandra Salinas, Editor in Chief

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Food insecurity is a daily problem that many people in the world are facing. Out of the 240 thousand people who are food insecure in Idaho, one in six children don’t know where their next meal will come from. As children are growing, their brain is developing as well, and without the right nutrition and energy, their knowledge can be affected. According to the American Psychological Association, “Malnutrition in the first years of life is especially harmful, impacting physical growth, decreasing resistance to disease, limiting the size and functioning of children’s brain structures and stunting intellectual capacity.” This can lead to stress, depression and anxiety as they grow. In today’s world, people are more likely to judge others without even knowing them. This is where the anxiety and depression comes in. Food insecure people are embarrassed to go get help because of their low income or having others see them. According to INC., “Judgmental people are always quick to jump to conclusions. They are poor listeners and communicators.” Therefore, the needy shouldn’t be worried about what others say.

The community of Idaho Falls has a food bank that is able to provide food to the ones in need. “Currently, we serve over 850 families monthly, with some months exceeding 1,000 families (over 4,000 individuals),” the Community Food Basket of Idaho Falls states.  A senior here at Skyline is one of the many who use the food bank and the Skyline food pantry.

[“My family has been going to the food bank for a long while now. It has been at least five years now.” ] 

The CFB-IF has been serving the community since 1980. Although the food bank helps families and individuals, the most difficult process of getting help is asking. “This is one of the hardest things to do for some people, mainly because they do not want other people seeing them that they need help,” the Pokemon lover said.
Not only is there the food bank, but Skyline has its own food pantry. The food pantry at Skyline has a variety of food from pancake mix, to meat, canned food and rice. The problem with this is that students are afraid to ask for help. “‘Is it possible that I can get food for my family to eat dinner tonight and tomorrow night?’Asking that question was really hard,” the 18 year old said. The counseling secretary Jodi Fohs is willing to help any student who is in need. The pantry is open on Mondays before school and Thursdays after school.

Skyline also helps to the community by doing the annual Soup’er Bowl. This is the fourteenth year that the school collects food and money for the food bank. “I, myself, really understand what it means to help this cause because I am reason for the cause,” the yearbook editor said. It is an event that has been giving over 100 thousand cans to the food bank for the past two years. Although rivalry against other schools comes into play, the real reason Skyline comes together is to help the ones in need. “When I look where we are as a family, it’s hard sometimes. My family is more lucky than others as in not needing to go to the food bank all the time or having a little extra money at the end of the month, but there are times when we really need food in the house. There are times in the house that I choose to not eat in order to have my family eat, or there are times where I ask them to only buy me ramen. The reason being that I would give up my food for them,” he said.

By doing the Soup’er Bowl, the food bank is able to survive through the summer. Thirty percent of the food at the food bank is given by Skyline. “You know, one out of 20 students at Skyline need food. Now think, there are around 1,200 students in the school, and 60 of us need help gathering food for our next meal,” Keegan Storer (12) said. Storer is a well known senior who is very outgoing and loves to play his Pokemon Go wherever and whenever. His friendly personality has been with him since kindergarten and his smooth jokes have improved as the years pass by. Storer has been a great student, friend, and editor. The reason this is said is because although he and his family have struggled, there is never a day where he is not seen smiling and giving a smile to the people around him. “Hi, I am Keegan Storer and I am a person that uses the food bank and the Skyline food pantry.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Focus

    College or Vocational: Pros & Cons

  • Starvation struggle: The need is real

    Focus

    Isabel Gonzalez-Salazar: More than just a painting

  • Focus

    Advantages of Arts in Education

  • Focus

    Obesity in children under five rises

  • Starvation struggle: The need is real

    Focus

    Weight watchers offers 6 weeks free for teens

  • Focus

    Veganism: key to end world hunger

  • Starvation struggle: The need is real

    Focus

    Pets: More than just a want Psychological benefits of owning a furry friend

  • Starvation struggle: The need is real

    Focus

    Students help animals at local shelter

  • Starvation struggle: The need is real

    Focus

    Worldwide Cultural Celebrations

  • Starvation struggle: The need is real

    Focus

    Dia de los Muertos

The Official Online Newspaper of Skyline High School
Starvation struggle: The need is real