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Busted: Mary J. and friends

Marijuana also referred to as

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Marijuana also referred to as "Mary Jane" , "Mary J." or "weed" is known to be used more by the younger generations.

Alejandra Salinas, Editor in chief

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   Skyline has had more drug cases this year than in the past five years according to Student Resource Officer John Cowley, the most recent contraband being confiscated during a routine locker search last week.  As the years pass by, it seems that the younger generations are becoming more irresponsible. A majority of these teenagers are being introduced to new things besides their cell phones. “It’s more in the freshmen and sophomores. They seem to be more immature,” Cowley said. Is it the media who is giving teenagers curiosity, or is it parents giving their children more freedom?

   According to The Partnership, “Sometimes friends urge one another to have a drink or smoke pot, but it’s just as common for teens to start trying a substance because it’s readily available and they see all their friends enjoying it.” The problem behind this is that these drugs can become an addiction, leading to brain damage at a young age since they are still developing.  “According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, in 2015, more than one million youths in the United States between the ages of 12 and 17 met diagnostic criteria for problem use or dependence (addiction) on illicit drugs or alcohol,” The National Institutes of Health reported.  

  On Dec. 4, the school had a shelter in place during first hour. A shelter in place was implemented for both a drug bust and teacher training. “The dogs bark all the time. They will attack and bite,” Cowley said. Freshman English teacher Suzette Klein thought the shelter in place was a good idea since her classroom was right next to the locker where the dogs went crazy. “They were pawing at one of the lockers and barking. My class was uninterested. They didn’t panic and they continued to do what they were supposed to be doing,” Klein said. But not all shelter in places are used for drug busts. Any time there is danger out of the school, the administration will call for a shelter in place, meaning they will lock all the doors so nothing or no one can enter the school or move through the halls and attempt to harm others, but normal routines in the classroom continue.

  Many people might think the most common drug used by teenagers is marijuana, but that is actually wrong. Officer Cowley mentioned the most common drug found on students is Triple C. “I don’t see the fun in that. It makes you sick and puke,” he said. Triple C is the slang term for Coricidin HBP Cough & Cold. The effects vary depending on how many are ingested, but the body’s health is always at risk when abused by any drug. These over-the-counter pills are causing teens to either steal them or buy them from others.

 Any student who is caught with any drug at school will be punished. The punishment varies depending on the amount and what type of drug it is. For example, being caught with less than three ounces of marijuana is a misdemeanor. As reported by Cowley, the school will suspend the student for three days, and the misdemeanor stays on the teen’s public record and may prevent them from being hired for a job. Once it is more than three ounces, then they will be charged for delivery, and that is a felony. There, the student could be expelled for an entire year. Students are being found in the parking lots with drugs or they are coming into the school high. Marijuana has a distinct smell from the rest of the drugs, and it is easy to smell behind all that spray of cologne or perfume.

  A willingness to experiment with new drugs can lead to addiction and more harmful drugs. Marijuana is a gateway drug for some people. Some teens use it to feel high and relaxed, but consuming too much can lead to paranoia and anxiety. According to Harvard Medical School, not only does weed damage the lungs, it also affects the brain. Although people in some states are fighting to legalize Marijuana, to this day, it is still illegal in Idaho. “Don’t [do drugs]. There are so many other things to do… It’s illegal. End of story,” Cowley said.

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