WestSide Story

Dia de los Muertos

El+Gallo+Giro+Mexican+Restaurant+in+Boise%2C+Idaho%2C+set+up+an+altar+in+the+restaurant.+This+included+photos+of+peoples+loved+ones+who+passed+away.+
El Gallo Giro Mexican Restaurant in Boise, Idaho, set up an altar in the restaurant. This included photos of peoples loved ones who passed away.

El Gallo Giro Mexican Restaurant in Boise, Idaho, set up an altar in the restaurant. This included photos of peoples loved ones who passed away.

Alejandra Salinas

Alejandra Salinas

El Gallo Giro Mexican Restaurant in Boise, Idaho, set up an altar in the restaurant. This included photos of peoples loved ones who passed away.

Alejandra Salinas, Editor in Chief

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






El Dia de los Muertos, also known as Day of the Dead, is a Mexican holiday that is celebrated from Nov. 1 to Nov. 2. Many think it is similar to Halloween, but it is a different holiday. It is a day to honor the dead and remember their life. The living use this holiday to connect with the dead. Families of the deceased create altars at home with a picture of their loss. They surround it full of candles, flowers, sugar skulls and pan de muerto which is bread for the dead. The first day is meant for the children who have passed away. Then they celebrate the adults on the second day.

  Although the families cannot physically feel or see their loved ones, they are confident the gates of heaven have opened and their spirits are present. Besides creating altars at home, the community has live music playing from morning to night. They decorate the streets with papel picado which is multicolored paper cut outs. The Aztecs entertain the community during the day parade. Families also visit the cemetery, clean it and decorate their lost one’s grave. They leave items from alcohol and bread to clothes and toys. They also spend hours talking to them about the memories they had together. They make it clear to their loved ones that they are not forgotten no matter how much time has passed.  

  There are dozens of people walking around with painted faces. They do not paint their face to scare others, but rather to have people look at it as death itself and face the fact that death is for everyone. People then believe that these spirits will provide them protection, good luck and wisdom to their families. This tradition keeps the community and the far, close.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Focus

    Veganism: key to end world hunger

  • Dia de los Muertos

    Focus

    Starvation struggle: The need is real

  • Dia de los Muertos

    Focus

    Pets: More than just a want Psychological benefits of owning a furry friend

  • Dia de los Muertos

    Focus

    Students help animals at local shelter

  • Dia de los Muertos

    Focus

    Worldwide Cultural Celebrations

  • Focus

    Haunted Attractions

  • Dia de los Muertos

    Focus

    Loss of Sleep: How Bad Is It?

  • Dia de los Muertos

    Focus

    How to Deal With Sleep-loss (or Insomnia)

  • Dia de los Muertos

    Focus

    Your phone affects how well you sleep

  • Dia de los Muertos

    Focus

    Sleepless in September

The Official Online Newspaper of Skyline High School
Dia de los Muertos